POETRY AS GRIEF THERAPY

May 13, 2010

 

by Cay Randall-May, Ph.D., the Healer Who Creates

    On May l, 2010, I attended a Survivors of Suicide (SOS) conference held in Phoenix, Arizona, facilitated by Stuart Smith of The Link Counseling Center in Atlanta, Georgia.  As part of his all-day presentation, Smith led the group of approximately 100 participants in an exercise intended to help us process our grief through poetry. 

    He directed us to write down words at random while listening to a brief selection of semi-classical music.  When the music stopped and each person had a list of words, he suggested that we form them together into a poem. 

    Several people volunteered to read their poems to the group.  They presented a range of  iambic pentameter, free verse, loose association prose poems.  Each poet had heard the same music but responded from their depths to craft a uniquely healing composition. 

    Here is mine created in that very brief period.  It’s a fragment, not polished, but an example of how the ‘creative response’ which I describe in my book, “Healing and the Creative Response” (Brooks Goldmann Publ., 2010) can be used.

Through window framed

by frosty moonlight

silver sails seek safe harbor

against restless surf.

Over a kaleidoscope of  slick stones

I stumble through shimmering dunes

With shredded maroon velvet hem

Cascading through memories’ dream prism.

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POETRY AS GRIEF THERAPY

May 13, 2010

By Cay Randall-May,  the Healer Who Creates 

    On May l, 2010, I attended a Survivors of Suicide (SOS) conference held in Phoenix, Arizona, facilitated by Stuart Smith of The Link Counseling Center in Atlanta, Georgia.  As part of his all-day presentation, Smith led the group of approximately 100 participants in an exercise intended to help us process our grief through poetry.  

    He directed us to write down words at random while listening to a brief selection of semi-classical music.  When the music stopped and each person had a list of words, he suggested that we form them together into a poem. 

    Several people volunteered to read their poems to the group.  They presented a range of  iambic pentameter, free verse, loose association prose poems.  Each poet had heard the same music but responded from their depths to craft a uniquely healing composition. 

    Here is mine created in that very brief period.  It’s a fragment, not polished, but an example of how the ‘creative response’ which I describe in my book, “Healing and the Creative Response” (Brooks Goldmann Publ., 2010) can be used.

Through window framed

by frosty moonlight

silver sails seek safe harbor

against restless surf.

Over a kaleidoscope of  slick stones

I stumble through shimmering dunes

With shredded maroon velvet hem

Cascading through memories’ dream prism.

Poetry Play

April 12, 2010

by Cay Randall-May,  the Healer Who Creates 

At this moment are you a hummingbird, wings fluttering hundreds of times per minute, or a sea slug oozing through benthic gloom.  Maybe your wings are glued to flypaper or your inner earthworm is savoring a mother lode of vintage horse manure.  Are you the single dandelion surviving Spring’s herbicidal showers?  Bloom, bloom, bloom through poetry.  

Words luscious as tiny sausages, each wrapped in a curl of crisp bacon, invite tasting.  Chew their syllables thoroughly, as inner ear bones dance with iambic, pentambic, schmambic oscillations.  Blow sound bubbles of pink heart-gum that stick to virtual cave walls.  “I chew, therefore I live,” they say.  

Sweat poems ooze from volcanic pores swallowing lesser perspectives, burying them, preserving them under ash like Pompeii.

You are fresher, cleaner, and purer because you erupted in poetry play.

Healing for the Highest Good

April 2, 2010

 

By Cay Randall-May, Ph.D., the Healer Who Creates

Not all spiritual healing occurs on the physical level, often emotional and spiritual levels are balanced. It’s not always clear what level(s) of healing are most needed or in which order, so I suggest that we be open to ‘healing for the highest good’. 

For example, a woman came to me with ‘frozen shoulder’, a painful condition involving limited mobility.  Lifting her arm was so painful that she was having difficulty carrying groceries, cooking, and doing some of her favorite activities and sports. Her physician suggested surgery.  

After speaking with her, I realized that her problem was not entirely skeletomuscular. She expressed to me a great deal of anger towards some of the people in her household.   As she and I discussed the impact of this suppressed inner rage, she began to understand the importance of healing the challenging situations in her life.

Although hands-on healing immediately reduced her pain level, I realized that until the underlying emotional complications were also addressed her discomfort would remain at a lower, chronic set point.  Together we brainstormed some steps she might take to lower her stressful home situation including prayer, meditation, improved communication, and increased exercise. 

The spiritual healing couldn’t do all these things for her, but it opened her mind to ways in which she could improve her situation, to accept the highest good in her life.  On some level the physical pain has served her by prompting her to pursue higher healing.

HEALING THROUGH PRAYER

March 27, 2010

 

By Rev. Cay Randall-May, Ph.D., the Healer Who Creates 

Prayers can be offered for many different reasons, for example, gratitude, praise, and thanksgiving.  Petition, prayers requesting something or for someone’s well-being, are common.  There are many viewpoints on the effectiveness of prayer, how it works, etc., but I would like to relate healing through prayer to the four steps to healing which I highlight my new book, “Healing and the Creative Response” (Brooks Goldmann Publ., 2010). 

Preparation for prayer, setting our intention in a prayerful manner, is an  essential first step.  Relaxing as much as possible into the moment minimizes distractions and helps us to focus as we enter into prayer.  Some religions and denominations formalize this preparation through ritual cleansing, blessing with sacred oil or water, use of prayer cloths or prayer shawls, etc. 

I have found that guided meditative relaxation is very effective.  Here are some other suggestions: 

Create a space in your garden, home, office where you can return on a regular basis to pray.  With practice, your mind will automatically become still when you enter this space.  If you travel or don’t have the extra room to set aside a permanent location, then use a prayer cloth, prayer rug, or other easily portable symbolic object which will set the emotional tone for your prayers wherever you place it. 

Establish a prayer routine.  Rigid times are not necessary, but setting aside a brief period for relaxation, spiritual reflection, and prayer at intervals throughout the day, such as dawn, noon, and evening, help to reduce anxiety and keep prayerful focus. 

When praying with others, take the time to first relax and center as a group before entering into formal prayer time. 

Please check this blog frequently, as I will be discussing prayer and healing through prayer in greater detail over the next couple of weeks.  If you are in the Phoenix, Arizona, area  please plan on attending my lecture and demo on “Higher Healing Through Prayer” on April 17, 2010.  Here are the details: 

SPONSOR:   ARE  AZ

LOCATION: Pyle Adult Center,  655 E. Southern Ave., Tempe, AZ 85252

12:30 pm,  doors open for book sales

Talk and demo:  1 to 3:30 pm 

Contact:  John Depuyde: 480-883-3822 or email johnjmjd@cox.net

Or Gina at szajda@cox.net

Romantic Adventure Novel Highlights Healing

March 8, 2010

 

By Cay Randall-May, Ph.D. , the Healer Who Creates

            Most books on healing are personal accounts with a self-help focus.  My own book, “Healing and the Creative Response”, is an example of this genre.  Seldom is the reader introduced to more personal aspects of a healer’s life.

            “Hidden Dimensions” by Debra Drecksel (iUniverse, 2009) is a romantic adventure story which takes a delightfully refreshing look at the topic of healing through the viewpoint of a healer.   I was fascinated with Drecksel’s compelling development of  her leading character, Monica, as she pursues her lifelong dream.  

            There is something for everyone here:  life path struggles; outdoor adventure; sensuous love making; and resolution of inner conflict about healing as a life choice.  Drecksel weaves fiction with non-fiction as she allows the characters to discuss topics as diverse as dealing with the challenge of mental illness in the family to quantum string theory physics. Readers, especially those who are drawn to the path of spiritual healing and have wondered how it fits into the natural world, will be glued to this book. 

            I recommend “Hidden Dimensions” to everyone interested in healing as a vocation and to anyone who wants to explore the phenomenon of natural healing.  Visit Drecksel’s web site www.HiddenDimensionsNovel.com to learn more about the author and to view a promotional video.  The book can be purchased through

BarnesandNoble.com

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbninquiry.asp?box=1440166382&pos=-1&EAN=9781440166389

Amazon.com

http://www.amazon.com/Hidden-Dimensions-Debra-Drecksel/dp/1440166382/ref=ed_oe_p

People can contact the author through the ”Contact Debra” page on her website http://www.authordebra.com/ or by e-mail at Debra@AuthorDebra.com.

Intention, the first KEY TO HEALING

January 3, 2010

Healer Who Creates,  Cay Randall-May, Ph.D.

In my new book,”Healing and the Creative Response” (Brooks Goldmann Publ., 2010), I describe four key steps to healing which are common to many different modalities.   Intention is the first step.   Rothlyn Zahourek, Ph.D., has published her definitive study, “Intentionality: The Matrix of Healing..A qualitative Theory for Research, Education and Practice” which I will be writing more about in the near future.  After researching the topic from the point of view of both the healer and healee she has concluded that aside from the general intention of well-being there are two major levels of intentionality in healing:  the first promotes curing and restoration of equilibrium; the second catalyzes transformation on multiple levels.  After reading Dr. Zahourek’s book I am convinced that the four keys to healing which I describe in my book relate to this last level.  If followed correctly, the four keys definitely promote improved self-expression and creativity.

Intention, the First Step to Healing

January 3, 2010

In my new book, “Healing and the Creative Response” (Brooks Goldmann Publ., 2010) I outline and describe in detail four key steps which are common to many forms of natural and spiritual healing. The first of these steps is to set our intention.
In her new book, “Intentionality: The Matrix of Healing” Rothlyn Zahourek, Ph.D. explores many aspects of the subject from the point of view of healers and healees. This work is certain to remain the definite authority on this subject for many years. She describes two different levels of intentionality, one which aims to facilitate curing through various modalities and approaches and the second one which catalyzes personal and interpersonal transformation.
As I read Dr. Zahourek’s book I recognized many instances of how the four key steps to healing which I describe in my book apply to her research, as well.
I can highly recommend her book to anyone who would like to learn more about the influence of intentionality on the process of healing.

Karen Grace Kassy, Multitalented Intuitive

December 4, 2009

 

By Healer Who Creates, Cay Randall-May, Ph.D.

      Karen Grace Kassy moves easily through many roles.  On any particular day you might find her leading a workshop on intuition or yoga, consulting with a client, firing raku or horsehair pottery, or picking banjo with her musical friends. KAREN’S CREATIVE ENDEAVORS HAVE ONLY COME ALIVE IN THE LAST FEW YEARS. SHE IS QUICK TO POINT OUT THAT YOU CAN BLOSSOM YOUR CREATIVITY AT ANY AGE – YOU’RE NEVER TOO OLD. AND, LIKE INTUITION, SHE FEELS HER MUSICAL AND ARTISTIC EXPRESSIONS ARE A SKILL THAT SHE HAS PRACTICED, NOT A GIFT – THEY ARE ACCESSIBLE TO ANYONE.  In my book, “Healing and the Creative Response”, I state that many intuitives and healers are also highly creative and this vital young woman proves my point.

     Author of “Health Intuition. A Simple Guide to Greater Well-Being” (Hazelden, 2000) Kassy is one of today’s most gifted intuitive consultants, specializing in health and healthy relationships. In this capacity she often interacts with clients while in a deepened state of consciousness for several hours a day.  Burnout, fatigue and energetic imbalance can take their toll on individuals in this profession.  To keep herself energetically and physically grounded, Karen Kassy works with clay, practices and teaches yoga, enjoys a wide variety of outdoors activities including rock climbing, cross-country skiing, and horseback riding.

    As Karen’s intuitive career broadens and deepens, she is opening to even greater creative potential.  You can see for yourself the scope of her skills by visiting her web site:

www.karengracekassy.com

 Learn more about her relationship intuitive work by visiting:

http://karengracekassy.com/relationship.html

and her Etsy site for pottery:

 http://www.etsy.com/shop/HorsehairRakuPottery

Ezshwan: Artist and Way-Shower

November 9, 2009

By Cay Randall-May, Ph.D.;  HealerWhoCreates

 

          Few people are as spontaneously creative, resourceful, and courageous as Ezshwan.  It has been my pleasure to know this magnificently energetic woman for more than 20 years.  You will have a sense of the scope of her work when you visit this video retrospective of her work. 

 

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNTKkKsySyM

 

          Widow, mother, grandmother, artist, practitioner and teacher of yoga, author, business owner, educator, friend and mentor… she is all of these and more.  Her  intense love of life and dedication to be fully in each moment shows through the wide spectrum of her art. 

          At a mature age, when many artists would have quietly slowed their efforts, Ezshwan joyfully moved from Scottsdale, Arizona, to San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, where her work has become more well recognized and valued than ever before.  Her love affair with Mexico is definitely two-way, as her art pieces have focused more and more on subjects, colors, and textures inspired by the people and customs of this country. 

          Her life is an inspiration to artists of all ages.  Please visit her web site www.ezshwan.com  and enter into the world as seen through her eyes.  You will be inspired.