Archive for September, 2009

Recruiting Our Creative Dream Team

September 20, 2009

by Cay Randall-May…the Healer Who Creates

 

            When I recently wrote a course outline to accompany my new book, Healing and the Creative Response (see www.HealingCreativeResponse.com) I didn’t stress over it.  Instead, I called on my ‘dream team’ to do the writing.  This is the best way I know to get past any blocks to innovation and imagination.  This works well for planning any sort of project including reports, business plans, speeches, your next play or novel.  Here is how:

 

  • Review the task for about ten minutes before going to sleep.

 

  • Let go of the need to consciously plan the outcome, just go to sleep.

 

  • Don’t expect to dream about the project. You may, but it’s not necessary.

 

  • Be prepared to record the results of the dream. 

 

Be patient and practice. Your inner dream team may not be recruited all at once or

every time you try. The more you call on it, the easier it will become.  The results may not ‘download’ right away, in fact I find they often come when I least expect them.  It’s not unusual for a creative idea to pop into my mind in the middle of the night after I have set my intention to call on my dream team.  Here’s the deal:

 

  • Stress cuts off creativity, so wasting hours worrying over a deadline won’t help.

 

  • When we set our intention and relax, releasing the need to control the outcome,we activate what I call the Creative Response.

 

  • The Creative Response connects us to levels of imagination we often don’t use.

 

Creative ideas flow fast.  They may stick in your mind or fly through it as softly as a butterfly.  In either case, be ready to write or otherwise record them.  Then you can refine, edit, or flesh them out.

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Creative Dream Team

September 20, 2009

Recruiting Our Creative Dream Team

 

by Cay Randall-May…the Healer Who Creates

 

            When I recently wrote a course outline to accompany my new book, Healing and the Creative Response (see www.HealingCreativeResponse.com) I didn’t stress over it.  Instead, I called on my ‘dream team’ to do the writing.  This is the best way I know to get past any blocks to innovation and imagination.  This works well for planning any sort of project including reports, business plans, speeches, your next play or novel.  Here is how:

 

  • Review the task for about ten minutes before going to sleep.

 

  • Let go of the need to consciously plan the outcome, just go to sleep.

 

  • Don’t expect to dream about the project. You may, but it’s not necessary.

 

  • Be prepared to record the results of the dream. 

 

Be patient and practice. Your inner dream team may not be recruited all at once or every time you try. The more you call on it, the easier it will become.  The results may not ‘download’ right away, in fact I find they often come when I least expect them.  It’s not unusual for a creative idea to pop into my mind in the middle of the night after I have set my intention to call on my dream team.  Here’s the deal:

 

  • Stress cuts off creativity, so wasting hours worrying over a deadline won’t help.

 

  • When we set our intention and relax, releasing the need to control the outcome,

we activate what I call the Creative Response.

 

  • The Creative Response connects us to levels of imagination we often don’t use.

 

Creative ideas flow fast.  They may stick in your mind or fly through it as softly as a butterfly.  In either case, be ready to write or otherwise record them.  Then you can refine, edit, or flesh them out.

Muse News

September 5, 2009

Muse News

 

By Cay Randall-May, Ph.D.

 

            My eyes opened at 4:30am this morning, even though the alarm hadn’t sounded.  Before I went to the gym for some exercise or had breakfast I was finishing a painting which had been resting on my easel for a couple of weeks.  Although I had tried many times to work on it during that time period, for some reason I couldn’t finish it before this morning.  The ancient Greeks would have said that the Muse of painting hadn’t paid me a visit until today.

            Muses were believed to give knowledge and inspire creativity in humans.  Originally thought to be limited to three goddesses, by 400 B.C. nine muses were recognized.  They were commonly worshiped in Delphi and throughout the ancient world.

            Most people today don’t acknowledge Muses, but it sure is great when my paintbrush skims the canvas in an effortless dance of light and color.  On some other days when it doesn’t feel that way it’s more like shoveling mud.  Those are the days when I  have learned to put the brushes and paints away.  It’s best to plant or weed in my garden, take a walk, or chat with a friend.

            Of course we can still produce something when we aren’t inspired, and I remember writing, drawing, and painting to meet a deadline.  The product was adequate, in some cases even more, but it wasn’t alive with my inner creative passion.

            Has the artesian well of creativity, which the ancients believed was tapped by the Muses, done dry?  If it hasn’t how can someone tap into it? 

            In my new book, Healing and the Creative Response , I describe what I call ‘four keys to healing’ which when applied in our lives can open us to greater expression.  The first step is to set one’s intention.  The ancients did this by making offerings and in other ways worshiping the Muses.  They actively invited the Muses to touch their hearts and minds. 

            Watch the words you use.  Each has intention.  Describe yourself to self and to others as creative, alive.  Have your tools and supplies ready so that you don’t need to waste precious energy preparing to create when inspiration does come.  Most important of all, listen to your inner passion and follow its lead.  At first the impulse may be very faint, just a nudge to write a few words, etc.  The more you allow yourself the time to act on inspiration, the stronger it will become.